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"Too Much Information", Blink Contemporary Art, 2012

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“In the future all our data will be stored in the cloud”.
WIRED Magazine

This quote filled me with wonder…
If the clouds are now filled with data, where do the dead people sit?
Have the angels and the cherubs been evicted?
How does the data get up there?
And who owns all that data?
Do we need very tall ladders to unlock the clouds and get our data? Is there a key?

Just what does the “ Information Cloud” look like?

littleBlackDress

I am honored to announce that the entire Little Black Dress installation, (all 100 figures, dresses imprinted with poetry, video and sound) has been invited to The Meijer Sculpture Gardens in Grand Rapids, MI. as part of their Fall exhibition, Sculpture Today: New Forces, New Forms.

It is also part of ARTPRIZE 2011. artist seal 2011

The exhibition dates are September 21- December 31 and will feature 25 artists from across the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and France!
Sherry, Niki and I are thrilled to be included and hope to see you at the Opening on Tuesday, Sept. 20 from 6-8:00 pm.

If you haven't been there, the Gardens are spectacular; hundreds of acres filled with world class sculpture and a first rate museum right in the middle! We are in the museum.

warninghands

Here are a few images of sculptures from "Hook, Line & Sinker" a past show at Blink Contemporary Art in Michigan City, IN.

Hook, Line & Sinker Photo1
Hook, Line & Sinker Photo2
Hook, Line & Sinker Photo3

I began them during the Gulf oil spill. Entitled, "Caught", they are life sized figure fragments made of wood veneers covered by fishing nets. Once again, our uneasy relationship with nature becomes apparent: we trap and become entrapped!

Our “Little Black Dress” installation created by Suzanne (sculpture),
Sherry Antonini (poetry & sound) and Niki Nolin (video) is still getting around.

In April, selections of the sculpture and the text were seen at the
Rockford Art Museum as part of the 2010 Rockford Midwest Exhibition.

From there, the sculptures and video went to Art Chicago 2010 as part of the CSI (Chicago Sculpture International) booth at the Merchandise Mart and finally, they moved to the Koehnline Museum at Oakton Community College for the “Sculpture Invasion 2010” for the rest of the summer of 2010.

And now, they are on their way to becoming part of an interactive performance/installation. Stay Tuned!

3538 North Pine Grove
Chicago, IL 60657
773/472-7888 • Studio 219/879-2994
email
venuscouncil.com
chicago sculpture international

Bio
Suzanne Cohan-Lange is a sculptor, designer and art educator whose principal concern over the past thirty years has been the design of educational programs, museums  and art installations using a collaborative, interdisciplinary approach.

Suzanne recently retired as founder, Chair and Professor Emeritus of the Graduate Department of Interdisciplinary Arts at Columbia College, after 25 years and the design of three graduate programs including the highly regarded Center for the Book and Paper Arts.

Ms. Cohan-Lange co-founded and designed Chicago’s first Children’s Museum, ExpressWays Children’s Museum, 1982 (now the Chicago Children’s Museum.) She has since designed several museums in Chicago and the Midwest including the Arti-Fact Center at Spertus Institute, the children’s facility at the Swedish Museum of Chicago and a multi-arts center for Pathways, a state agency that provides housing and services for  Chicago area foster children.

Suzanne is currently on The Board of Directors and is Chair of the Curatorial Committee of the Lubeznik Center for the Arts. She and her husband, painter Richard Lange, co-own Blink Contemporary Art, a studio/gallery in Michigan City, IN.

As a sculptor, Suzanne has worked in steel, resin, cast paper and more recently, wood. Her current work combines carved and found wood with man made objects, video, poetry and sound in large scale sculpture and multi-media installations being shown extensively in Chicago and the Midwest.

Her sculpture has always dealt with the figure as a metaphor for the human condition.